Advertisers are Sneaky

National Techmark (site is mostly text with stock photos) left an odd comment on my About Page:

advertising inquiry:https://fitnessfortheoccasion.wordpress.com/

Hello,

I’ve recently looked over your site and believe that your reader-base and visitors might be a possible advertising venue for us.

I am interested in traditional link advertising as well as using link “blurbs” on certain pages of your site, or on certain articles – perhaps even submitting articles. This includes but is not limited to purchasing a post also. We are open to any idea that would allow us to capture interested readers, but would prefer to avoid the traditional “Ads by Google” and “Sponsored Links” sections.

Please let me know if you’d be open to discussing advertising possibilities further.

Thanks in advance,
Travis
National Techmark

As I don’t like spam, I removed the comment.  But I thought it was very interesting, so here I am writing about it.  Rather than email me, this fellow stating he works for NT decided to leave a very public post on my About Page.  But it is his request that truly intrigued me:

perhaps even submitting articles. This includes but is not limited to purchasing a post also. We are open to any idea that would allow us to capture interested readers, but would prefer to avoid the traditional “Ads by Google” and “Sponsored Links” sections.

Right off the bat, he’s talking about deceptive advertising practices.  Purchasing a post?  Avoiding “Ads by Google” and “Sponsored Links” would blend his ads into my site, mixing them with the causes and sites I proudly support.

In any case, this is all moot.  As a wordpress.com blog, I can’t add advertising to my site.  And frankly, given the level of robust service wordpress.com provides, for free, I’m not inclined to care.

If I could send any advice NT’s way, it would be to really tighten up their wandering marketing text, ditch the stock photography for something a little more personal and authentic, and stick to advertising that lets people know its advertising.  Playing secret games was cute in a toilet humor way when advertisers first discovered it, but now a good chunk of your target market has savvied up to the trickery, and we don’t like it.

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4 Responses

  1. […] Dan’s exposé of National Techmart’s rather blatant spam I would have thought they would have learned their lesson.  Apparently […]

  2. Are you sure you can’t add advertising to your WordPress.com blog? I have seen advertisements on many WordPress.com blogs, and I was actually considering doing google ads, myself. Even if nobody ever clicks on them, I might find it interesting to see what ads Google decides to pair with the different posts that I publish on my blog.

  3. I just got an email from them. Exact same wording. But my domain ownership is masked, so they sent it through the registrar, not through the blog itself. Strange to me. I wonder what they actually offer.
    Joe

  4. I just got an email from them, with the exact same wording – all that was different was the name of the person who supposedly sent the email. I googled them to find out more details, and found your post. I think it’s interesting that a year later they are still using the exact same paragraph to try to get bloggers to work with them. Bleh. Spammers suck.

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