The Conservative Bar for Iraq

Is sure set low (BoldColorConservative)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif) has again called the Iraq surge a failure.” Pelosi needs to read a letter written by an al Qaeda in Iraq leader Abu-Tariq to top terror leaders proclaiming the organization to be in extraordinary crisis,” and how the the defection of Sunnis to fight with the U.S. military has “created panic, fear, and the unwillingness to fight.”How is that not, as Pelosi claims, “the desired effect?”

Perhaps in 10 years when our soldiers are still in Iraq fighting insurgents, and the civil war is still raging with people being murdered every day, it will occur to conservatives that maybe the “desired effect” is peace and security for the Iraqi people. Perhaps in 10 years conservatives will learn to read the articles they link to:

“The purpose of the surge was to create a secure time for the government of Iraq to make the political change to bring reconciliation to Iraq,” Pelosi said on CNN’s “Late Edition.” “They have not done that.”

How low the bar has been set! Apparently the point of the surge was to get insurgent leaders to feel insecure about their organizations. If only Pelosi had read the letter!

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12 Responses

  1. I did read the article, thank you. I just don’t know how you can call the Iraq surge a failure when even the insurgents are claiming to be in extraordinary crisis. The Iraqi government has been passing significant legislation and country is liveable again. I don’t know why Liberals can’t give credit where credit is due. Perhaps it was not the correct decision to go into Iraq in 2003. But we couldn’t leave it in chaos. Do you want to offer a better solution or would you rather just criticize the success of others who have done the hard work?

  2. No JLG, the country is not livable again. Its come under a repression incarnation of sharia law. There are bombings and murders daily. The government is still sharply divided, and the police force is still under trained and corrupt.

    If the insurgents are in crisis, that is extraordinarily good news. But that was not the bar set for the surge. Just as the bar was changed and lowered after the initial invasion, there is an attempt to do the same to cover up the failure of the surge. Doing so is a deep disservice to everyone who has been dragged into the violent quagmire that is Iraq.

    Be clear on this, criticizing Iraq is not criticizing success. It is criticizing a stunning failure that has left a million dead, and millions more living in a hellhole of war and instability.

    I don’t claim to have all the answers, but one does not need to know the best path to stand up and fight taking the worst path.

  3. Leave them in chaos then? That was the other option. That seems like a worse option than cleaning up our mess with the surge. I don’t know where you get your stats for “a million dead,” but it’s not been anywhere close to that. You should get your facts straight. You may not have all of the answers, but you should at least have some of them.

  4. Check the sidebar to your left, JLG.

  5. JLG,
    That was not the only other option, unless viewing the world through the conservative black and white lens. Other options do present themselves, such as working to get the UN involved, building an international coalition. Another is to ask the Iraqi people what they want (they want us out), and listen.

    Where I get my stats? How many Iraqis do you think have died as a result of the invasion? Where do you get your info?

    My facts are rock solid. Further, those answers I do have are not driven by idealogical blindness and an inability to acknowledge reality.

    That seems like a worse option than cleaning up our mess with the surge.

    Did you forget the surge was to clean up our mess with the invasion? That it is actually the second surge, cleaning up the first? Do you suggest another surge, ad nauseum?

    When will Republican acknowledge the reality on the ground, and stop cheerleading the bloodletting?

  6. The Lancet study? It was funded by George Soros. So much for “not driven by idealogical blindness and an inability to acknowledge reality,” unless of course you consider Soros to be objective, in which case you are the one who is blind. Besides, the Lancet Report has already been debunked. So much for your “facts” being “rock solid.”

    Documentation here: http://boldcolorconservative.com/2008/01/14/soros-funds-another-false-study/

  7. Dan,

    What about this story? Are these guys wrong? I’m sure they too view the world through the conservative black and white lens.

    By Steven R. Hurst and Qassim Abdul-Zahra

    The Associated Press

    Seattle Times news services
    BAGHDAD — A year ago in Baghdad: Shiite militiamen and Sunni insurgents owned entire neighborhoods and key areas beyond. Iraq’s government was adrift, and U.S. commanders weighed the real possibility of being trapped in a full-scale civil war.

    In response, on Feb. 14, 2007, with the 82nd Airborne as the vanguard, Washington launched an American troop buildup that would climb to 30,000 extra U.S. soldiers by the summer.

    A year later — through a mix of military might, new allies and some fortunate timing — Iraq looks very different.

    Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government is still struggling to get firm footing but has recently tried to push through some of the U.S.-demanded political reforms for reconciliation.

    The U.S.-led forces have successfully tamped down violence, and the Pentagon has forged critical pacts with Sunni fighters against al-Qaida in Iraq, which is trying to regroup in northern parts of the country.

    After a sharp initial spike in military and civilian casualties, the numbers make a strong case that the surge generally accomplished its main goal.”

    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/iraq/2004179433_iraq13.html?syndication=rss

  8. And apparently, the New York Times is looking through that pesky Conservative black and white lense too:

    By Damien Cave and Alissa J. Rubin

    New York Times

    The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

    As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

    Iraqis are clearly surprised and relieved to see commerce and movement finally increase, five months after an extra 30,000 American troops arrived in the country…

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/world/middleeast/20surge.html?_r=2&ei=5065&en=7e7d43064c067b63&ex=1196226000&partner=MYWAY&pagewanted=print&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

  9. And apparently the New York Times is looking through that pesky “Conservative black and white lense,” too:

    By Damien Cave and Alissa J. Rubin

    The New York Times

    The security improvements in most neighborhoods are real. Days now pass without a car bomb, after a high of 44 in the city in February. The number of bodies appearing on Baghdad’s streets has plummeted to about 5 a day, from as many as 35 eight months ago, and suicide bombings across Iraq fell to 16 in October, half the number of last summer and down sharply from a recent peak of 59 in March, the American military says.

    As a result, for the first time in nearly two years, people are moving with freedom around much of this city. In more than 50 interviews across Baghdad, it became clear that while there were still no-go zones, more Iraqis now drive between Sunni and Shiite areas for work, shopping or school, a few even after dark. In the most stable neighborhoods of Baghdad, some secular women are also dressing as they wish. Wedding bands are playing in public again, and at a handful of once shuttered liquor stores customers now line up outside in a collective rebuke to religious vigilantes from the Shiite Mahdi Army.

    Iraqis are clearly surprised and relieved to see commerce and movement finally increase, five months after an extra 30,000 American troops arrived in the country…

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/world/middleeast/20surge.html?_r=2&ei=5065&en=7e7d43064c067b63&ex=1196226000&partner=MYWAY&pagewanted=print&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

  10. […] I told you yesterday about an interesting exchange that has been taking place between myself and another blogger.  He has not yet responded to my post but I thought I would address a couple other parts of his […]

  11. […] February 14, 2008 — JLG Here another, more recent refutation of the claim by “Dan (fitness)” that “Iraq is not livable again,” and his accusation that I’m merely […]

  12. […] do you mean when you say ‘Livable’?” is a question worth answering.  In the discussion surrounding a posted response to JLG’s bar for success in Iraq, I stated: No JLG, the country […]

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